FAQs

My pet has been having some medical issues that my veterinarian is currently addressing but I am concerned that things are not improving. Do I need a referral to have a consultation with one of your doctors before I can bring my pet in?

This is a commonly asked question. While we prefer to have a referral request from your veterinarian we understand that sometimes asking your veterinarian for a second opinion to a referral hospital can be uncomfortable. Veterinarians all want what is best for their patients and clients and communicating your wishes for a second opinion allows them to fulfill that while knowing that they provided your pet wonderful care to the best of their ability.

My pet is a current patient at Bend Veterinary Specialists. Who do I contact if my pet has complications related to current medical conditions after regular business hours?

If you feel that your pets condition requires immediate medical attention and our doctors are out of the office, or we are not open please contact your regular veterinarian.

What is a Board Certified Veterinary Internist?

A board-certified Internist, an ACVIM Diplomate, is a veterinarian who has undertaken further specialty training in the discipline of Veterinary Internal Medicine, and who has been certified by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) in the specialty of Small Animal Internal Medicine. Veterinarians wishing to become board certified must complete a three-year residency program, meet specific training and caseload requirements, and have published research. Residents train under ACVIM Diplomates which ensures that the resident receives training that follows strict guidelines. Once the residency has been completed, the resident must sit and pass a multiple day examination. If the resident passes the examination they are awarded a “diploma” in veterinary internal medicine, certifying them as an ACVIM Diplomate. Veterinary Internal Medicine encompasses the disciplines of cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, immunology, infectious disease, nephrology/urology, neurology and respiratory disease.

What is a Board Certified Veterinary Surgeon?

The term “ACVS Diplomate” refers a veterinarian who has been board certified (received a diploma) in veterinary surgery. Only veterinarians who have successfully completed the certification requirements of the ACVS are Diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons and can be called specialists in veterinary surgery. Veterinarians wishing to become board certified must complete a three-year residency program, meet specific training and caseload requirements, perform research and have their research published. This process is supervised by current ACVS Diplomates, ensuring consistency in training and adherence to high standards. Once the residency has been completed, the resident must sit for and pass a multiple day examination. Only then does the veterinarian earn the “diploma” of ACVS Diplomate. Veterinary Surgery encompasses all disciplines of surgery including general surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, oncologic and orthopedic surgery.

Do I need an appointment?

We are a walk-in emergency clinic and do not make appointments. If you are planning to bring your pet in for an emergency, please give us a call to let us know. This allows our staff to be prepared for your arrival.

What is an emergency?

An emergency is a sudden illness or accident—any unforeseen medical problem. Call us if your pet displays any of these symptoms:

  • Bleeding
  • Injury
  • Allergic reaction
  • Poisoning
  • Inability to urinate
  • Inability to get up or walk
  • Bites/Burns
  • Breathing difficulties
  • Pain/Discomfort

It has been our experience that symptoms described over the phone cannot always be properly interpreted. An examination of your pet is the best way to help identify any problem.

Do you offer payment options?

We do not have payment plans available and complete payment is due when services are rendered. We accept Visa, MasterCard, check, cash, and CareCredit. We understand veterinary care can be expensive. Inform our staff of any financial limitations so that we can work with you to come up with the best plan for you and your pet and make recommendations. Please see our Payment Options page for more information about what costs to expect.

What do I do if I’ve found injured wildlife?

Please use this guide or call Think Wild Central Oregon at 541-241-8680 before capturing a wild animal to bring it in for treatment. If you find a what appears to be an abandoned baby animal, please do not handle it. Observe, wait, and see. Mom might be nearby.

If you have found a clearly injured wild animal, carefully contain it, then call Think Wild to be referred to the proper wildlife rehabilitation facility for the species. Do not risk injury to yourself or others in attempt to contain a wild animal.

DO NOT attempt to care for wildlife in your home. Wild animals have unique care and rehabilitation requirements and their best chance for survival is to seek help from a licensed rehabilitator. Keeping a wild animal in captivity without a permit is against the law.

What if my pet needs to be hospitalized overnight?

Whether an animal comes into the clinic in critical condition, requiring inpatient care, or is transferred from your primary care veterinarian for continued overnight care, the Bend Veterinary Specialty & Emergency Center is available for overnight hospitalization. Our clinic is staffed by at least one veterinarian and one technician during all of our open hours, including nights, weekends, and holidays. If an animal needs overnight hospitalization, they will be monitored continuously throughout the night as they receive treatment. If your pet will require further critical care during hours in which the Bend Veterinary Specialty & Emergency Center is closed, you can transfer them to your primary care veterinary clinic for hospitalization. We will send all medical records of your pet’s stay with us to your primary care veterinarian so that they have a complete record of your pet’s treatment.

Is there a vet that can come to me?

Bend Veterinary Specialty & Emergency does not make home visits but there are some veterinarians in the area with mobile services. Click here for a list of veterinarians in the Central Oregon area. Mobile services are indicated.

Do you treat horses and livestock?

We do not treat livestock or equine patients. If you have an after hours emergency with an equine or livestock animal, your regular vet may have emergency farm visits available. Click here for a list of veterinarians in the Central Oregon area. Mobile services are indicated.

Do you offer spay/neuter/microchip/vaccination services?

Bend Veterinary Specialty & Emergency Center is strictly an emergency clinic and does not offer services such as spay, neuter, microchip, vaccinations, wellness exams, or dental cleanings. Click here for a list of primary care veterinarians in the Central Oregon area.

What if I’ve lost my pet or found a stray animal?

If you have found a stray animal that is sick or injured you can bring it to the Bend Veterinary Specialty & Emergency Center as a good Samaritan for us to treat. We can keep the animal here while it undergoes treatment and will transfer it to the Humane Society once it is stable.

If you have found a stray animal that is not sick or injured you can bring it in to the Bend Veterinary Specialty & Emergency Center so that we can scan it for a microchip in order to identify the owner. In this case, we are unable to board the animal in our clinic, and you will be responsible for transferring the animal to its owner, the Humane Society, or Central Oregon Animal Control.

If you have lost your pet you can call us to report it so that we have your contact information on file in case your pet is brought in. Other good resources for finding lost pets include:

What can I expect if my pet needs to be euthanized?

Unfortunately the time comes for many pet owners, when quality of life decisions need to be made. If you are facing this difficult decision, please call us at 541-312-2114 to discuss the best options for you and your pet specifically. You can expect to answer questions about whether you’d like to be present and body care options. We have options available for home burial or cremation.

Click here for grief resources.